Scott Tallon Walker
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

UCLH’s planning application for Phase 4 was approved by Camden Council planners on March 20. Pending approval by the Greater London Authority, it means building work can start in spring 2015. Proton Beam Therapy, a new world-leading radiotherapy for cancer patients, will be provided below ground and a state-of-the-art patient facility including a short stay surgical unit with inpatient beds and operating theatres will be built above ground.

The decision is a considerable milestone for this substantial and complex project that will end the need for UK children to travel to the US for life-saving treatment and, with a sister unit at The Christie Hospital in Manchester, will treat the most paediatric patients in the world.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

On behalf of University College London Hospitals, a full planning application has been submitted to Camden London Borough Council for the proposed Proton Beam Therapy Centre located at Grafton Way, London.

The proposal consists of the redevelopment of the former Odeon site and demolition of the Rosenheim Building to provide a Proton Beam Therapy (PBT) cancer treatment facility and day surgery facilities in 4 levels of basement; inpatient medical facilities and a ground floor retail unit (175 sq m approximate GIA) in a 7 storey development above ground (34,596.5 sq m GIA in total) including roof plant, a new pedestrian entrance on corner of Grafton Way and Huntley Street, a new service entrance on Huntley Street, a ground floor drop-off area off Grafton Way, and three roof gardens; and the relocation of the vacuum insulated evaporator (VIE) to University Street frontage inside a new enclosure.

The development will provide a cutting edge and significant enhancement to therapeutic cancer treatment services in the UK by providing world-leading radiotherapy treatment for cancer patients. This will have clear benefits for the health of the UK population, and cannot be over-stated being a clear Central Government priority. PBT targets tumours more accurately therefore resulting in less damage to surrounding tissue and reduced side effects, and significantly improving treatment in particularly vulnerable groups such as children.

The proposed development has been designed with spare capacity for 10 years of activity growth, and so can accommodate an increase in demand for this form of cancer treatment. 165 hospital beds will be provided helping to relieve the existing shortfall in beds at UCLH. The building has been specially designed in order that it can be easily cleaned/maintained, thereby ensuring a clean and sterile environment in which particularly vulnerable cancer patients can recover. The scheme will comprise new, below ground day surgery facilities thereby relieving the existing pressure on surgery facilities elsewhere within the UCLH estate, and providing much-needed support to UCLH cancer services

The development will deliver an exceptional design using very high quality materials befitting of the world-class nature of the PBT facility housed within. This will result in a significant enhancement to the appearance of the site, the surrounding area and Bloomsbury Conservation Area.

The proposed development will meet the BREEAM ‘excellent’ standard, hence giving rise to minimal carbon emissions. This is a significant enhancement to the existing situation at the Rosenheim Building, which by virtue of its historic construction is very energy inefficient.

Aside from the clear medical benefits of the proposals, the development will make use of an urban brownfield site, half of which has been vacant for approximately 40 years, hence repairing the urban fabric with a building of exceptional quality and bringing the land back into use.

The Proton Beam Therapy Centre at University College London Hospital is designed by Scott Tallon Walker Architects in association with Edward Williams Architects & Tsoi Kobus & Associates

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Associate Director Kevin Bates, who heads up the office of Scott Tallon Walker Architects in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, has been awarded the highest Architectural Award from Royal Institute of the Architects of Ireland. The RIAI Gold Medal, which is awarded every three years, was presented to Kevin by the President of Ireland, Michael D. Higgins, in November 2013.

The winning project is a set of Religious Hermitages (Postinia) located on a hillside in the Comeragh Mountains, Tipperary, in Ireland, which was completed in 2004 and designed with his former partner, Tom Maher.

The RIAI Citation included “Close to mature broad leaf trees, Poustinia is impeccably detailed and built. Every element is exquisitely considered. The rooms cantilevered off the hillside make the lightest of footprints. The cranked plan configuration with bespoke furniture and floors of local limestone entrap smooth plastered internal space to overlook a wider strikingly contrasting landscape. External walls and roofs fuse in a composition of alternating rough sawn douglas fir and smooth sawn larch strips. The contrasts of this wonderfully enigmatic project are resolved in ways which evoke its very spirit. Contradictions are synthesised in a clear and simple idea, suggesting a conjunction of the temporal and the transcendent”.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Plans for a new clinical facility in London – housing the world’s most advanced form of radiotherapy – are now open for public consultation.

The new development will start with the construction of a Proton Beam Therapy (PBT) Centre below ground. A state-of-the-art patient facility with patient beds and operating theatres will then be built above ground.

The whole facility is planned to be over 25,000 sq m with four floors below ground and five floors above ground. People will access the Centre through a main entrance at ground floor level on the corner of Grafton Way and Huntley Street.

Over the coming weeks UCLH (University College London Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust) will be listening to what local politicians, residents, patients and staff have to say about the proposals for the site on Grafton Way and Huntley Street in the heart of the capital. A public exhibition of the proposals, will be taking place on Monday 7th October, 2.30pm – 7.30pm, and Tuesday 8th October, 2.30pm – 7.30pm in University College Hospital’s Atrium. The development team will be available to answer questions about the proposals and the services that would be provided on site.

The Proton Beam Therapy Centre at University College London Hospital is designed by Scott Tallon Walker Architects in association with Edward Williams Architects & Tsoi Kobus & Associates

Further information is available on the UCLH website.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

The UK Government commits £250 million for innovative cancer treatment to save lives and reduce side effects.

A major new cutting edge radiotherapy treatment will be available in the UK thanks to £250 million of government funding to build two new facilities in Manchester and London, Public Health Minister Anna Soubry confirmed today.

The therapy – Proton Beam Therapy – is a particularly important form of cancer treatment as it targets tumours more precisely with less damage to surrounding tissues. This can improve the quality of life following cancer treatment, reduces side effects, especially for children and, because the NHS will be able to treat more people, it will save lives.

Currently, the NHS sends children and adults needing Proton Beam Therapy to the United States, but from 2018 it will be offered to up to 1,500 cancer patients at the Christie NHS Foundation Trust in Manchester and University College London Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust in London.

The Prime Minister’s commitment to increasing access to advanced radiotherapy treatments will significantly improve the experience for patients and their families who currently have to travel long distances for treatment.

 

The Proton Beam Therapy Centre at University College London Hospital is designed by Scott Tallon Walker Architects in association with Edward Williams Architects & Tsoi Kobus & Associates

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Details of world’s first 5G research centre revealed

The competition to design the new 5G Innovation Centre drew strong international competition when the University of Surrey received funding of £35 million last year to develop and fund the project. The funding for the project comes from a variety of sources including the Higher Education Funding Council for England (HEFCE) government and a range of corporate sponsors from the mobile communications industry.

Scott Tallon Walker’s concept for the new building creates a flexible space with a circular atrium that acts as a central lung and focus, to ensure maximum interaction amongst researchers. This ability to have both staff and students interact easily is a key element in the success of the design.

When built the scheme will achieve BREEAM ‘Excellent’ environmental rating using mixed mode, naturally ventilated, simple yet sophisticated energy concept for its ventilation. The materials used in the building are a pallet of low energy and maintenance elements including terracotta rain screen, aluminium, glass and steel, sympathetic to the adjoining buildings on all sides.

Professor Rahim Tafazolli, the Director for the new centre at the University, said: “It’s an exciting vision of what promises to be a very important centre for not only the University but for the whole of the UK and beyond.”

Peter Dudley, Scott Tallon Walker’s Director of Science and Technology, commented, “Our concept for this building was informed very much by how our own architects work. We see the new centre at the University of Surrey as a place where some of the finest minds in mobile communications from around the world will be sharing their visionary ideas. Our team has watched and studied how creative groups share ideas in the workplace and our design will mean that people will have a strong sense of contact, visual and/or aural, with colleagues during the working day. This leads to better collegiality but more importantly to the sparking of creative ideas, spurring people on with fresh suggestions while seeing the progress being made by colleagues. The Scott Tallon Walker practice is obviously delighted to have won such a prestigious competition but my colleagues working on the project are equally excited as they really want to see their ideas for this creative community in action.”

The research centre will accommodate both the university’s own researchers and those of its industry partners who will come and research at the university. Part of the overall proposal includes a test bed on campus, using lampposts as mobile signal base stations, that cover an area of four kilometres squared which will be used for demonstrations and proofs-of-concept.

The university’s Vice Chancellor Professor Sir Christopher Snowden, in announcing the scheme stated that, “The new 5G Centre will enable the UK to lead this rapidly expanding segment of the global digital economy. Locally, it will bring yet more momentum to the clusters of established and new high tech businesses on our Surrey Research Park. Finally, and very significantly for us, it consolidates the leading position of our own Centre for Communication Systems Research in Europe and paves the way for the further development of our long-term strategic partnerships with major global telecommunications organisations and significant inward investment into both Surrey and the UK.”

For further information contact either Peter Dudley or Sheila Carney

Scott Tallon Walker, 10 Cromwell Place, London SW7 2JN Tel - +44 (0)207 589 4949

 
 
 
 
 
 

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