Scott Tallon Walker
 
 
 
 
 

As part of Open House Dublin, Irelands biggest Architecture festival, four of Scott Tallon Walker Architects buildings will be on display this weekend. The Gibson Hotel Point Village, Commissioners of Irish Lights, The Royal College of the Physicians of Ireland and Busaras will be open to the public.

Open House Dublin is Ireland’s biggest architecture festival, allowing you to explore the architecture of the city. Dublin buildings of all types and periods will open up their doors, with special tours by hundreds of professionals and enthusiasts, completely for free!

Please visit Open House Dublin 2011 for further information and bookings.

 
 
 
 
 

As part of a series of talks for Green Building Week hosted by Irish Green Building Council members, Scott Tallon Walker Architects will lead the discussion on Green Building presenting some of our major projects.

Ronan Phelan, Director with Scott Tallon Walker Architects, will discuss our approach to sustainability in relation to four, very different, recently completed projects.

The projects include the refurbishment of PJ Carrolls Factory for the School of Informatics and Creative Arts, DKIT; Wexford Department of the Environment Offices, a BREEAM Excellent building; the Aviva Stadium; and Point Village – District Centre: a mixed use development in Dublin’s Docklands.

The event will take place at the Darc Space, North Great Georges Street, Dublin 1.

Lunch will be provided so those interested must RSVP to info@igbc.ie by Friday 16th September.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

After 141 years of providing care to the sick and elderly, Mary-mount/St Patrick’s Hospital is leaving its historical city home at Wellington Road, St Luke’s Cross, Cork. A new chapter of hospice/palliative care for people with advanced and serious illness opens later this year when a new larger Marymount complex opens off the Curraheen Road /Ballincollig bypass.

Designed by Scott Tallon Walker Architects (in collaboration with JDDK Architects) and built on 10 acres at a total cost of €60m it will almost double the number of beds for vitally needed hospice care for Cork city and county, in a bright, modern environment. Hospice bed numbers will rise from 24 to 44, with a further 75 beds for care of the elderly, as well as a range of specialist services including radiotherapy and oncology.

MORE THAN 1,800 people have signed up for a tour of the new palliative care hospital in Cork before its official opening next month.

Irish Times Article: Palliative care hospital opens to public

Curraheen Hospital, Hospice & Elderly Care Facility

 
 
 
 
 

The final of this year’s Sustainable Design & Research (SDAR) Awards was held in DIT Kevin Street. University College Cork’s (UCC) Western Gateway Building was chosen as the overall winner.

The Western Gateway Building (WGB) designed by Scott Tallon Walker Architects is the largest building on the UCC Complex at 25,000m² providing research and teaching accommodation for a range of academic departments such as Computer Science, Biochemistry, Mathematics, Pharmacology, Physiology, ICT and Cancer Research

The SDAR Awards is a joint initiative between DIT and CIBSE, supported by bs news, and sponsored by John Sisk & Son. It is different to other competitions in that it is intended to encourage research, disseminate knowledge gained from this research, and raise the level and quality of innovation in projects.

Case Study for the Integration of Low Temperature Heating & High Temperature Cooling Systems.

 
 
 
 
 

In these turbulent times, Open House Dublin has adopted the theme 'THE ARCHITECTURE OF CHANGE', exploring how good design can be a catalyst for change and positively touch all our lives: from large scale master planning to small but skillful interventions in residential design.

Confirmed highlights include the Point Village and its destination Gibson Hotel, bespoke home Hedge House by GKMP Architects and skillful conversion Three into Two house in the Liberties by Brian O’Brien of Solearth Ecological Architecture.

Open House Dublin 2011 takes place from 7th to 9th October.

Visit Open House for more information

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

The Tyndall National Institute at University College Cork was the final destination for Queen Elisabeth to complete an historic four day tour of Ireland. The Tyndall Institute, established in 2004, is one of Europe’s leading Nano-Technology research centers specialising in ICT hardware research, the commercialisation of technology and the education of next generation researchers.

The tour included an inspection of the new laboratory research building, sited in the historic Lee Maltings complex beside the River Lee. The new facility, designed by Scott Tallon Walker Architects, was opened in 2009 and provides world-class laboratory and clean rooms for the Institute. A glazed atrium cleverly links an existing listed building with the new facilities, and provides a brightly-lit energy efficient research environment. This approach to energy management for the new facility was so successful, that when audited it showed a 70% reduction in CO2 emissions per researcher.

The Tyndall Institute was named after John Tyndall, the prominent 19th Century Irish physicist, who rose to fame in the 1850s when he invented a method for the destruction of bacteria in food, which he named Tyndallisation. His later work included studies in relation to the scattering of light by particulate impurities in the air, known today as the Tyndall Effect.


Tyndall National Institute

University College Cork - Tyndall National Institute

Irish Times - An Irishwoman's Diary

Irish Times - Tyndall Institute

 
 
 
 
 
 

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