Scott Tallon Walker
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

After 141 years of providing care to the sick and elderly, Mary-mount/St Patrick’s Hospital is leaving its historical city home at Wellington Road, St Luke’s Cross, Cork. A new chapter of hospice/palliative care for people with advanced and serious illness opens later this year when a new larger Marymount complex opens off the Curraheen Road /Ballincollig bypass.

Designed by Scott Tallon Walker Architects (in collaboration with JDDK Architects) and built on 10 acres at a total cost of €60m it will almost double the number of beds for vitally needed hospice care for Cork city and county, in a bright, modern environment. Hospice bed numbers will rise from 24 to 44, with a further 75 beds for care of the elderly, as well as a range of specialist services including radiotherapy and oncology.

MORE THAN 1,800 people have signed up for a tour of the new palliative care hospital in Cork before its official opening next month.

Irish Times Article: Palliative care hospital opens to public

Curraheen Hospital, Hospice & Elderly Care Facility

 
 
 
 
 

The final of this year’s Sustainable Design & Research (SDAR) Awards was held in DIT Kevin Street. University College Cork’s (UCC) Western Gateway Building was chosen as the overall winner.

The Western Gateway Building (WGB) designed by Scott Tallon Walker Architects is the largest building on the UCC Complex at 25,000m² providing research and teaching accommodation for a range of academic departments such as Computer Science, Biochemistry, Mathematics, Pharmacology, Physiology, ICT and Cancer Research

The SDAR Awards is a joint initiative between DIT and CIBSE, supported by bs news, and sponsored by John Sisk & Son. It is different to other competitions in that it is intended to encourage research, disseminate knowledge gained from this research, and raise the level and quality of innovation in projects.

Case Study for the Integration of Low Temperature Heating & High Temperature Cooling Systems.

 
 
 
 
 

In these turbulent times, Open House Dublin has adopted the theme 'THE ARCHITECTURE OF CHANGE', exploring how good design can be a catalyst for change and positively touch all our lives: from large scale master planning to small but skillful interventions in residential design.

Confirmed highlights include the Point Village and its destination Gibson Hotel, bespoke home Hedge House by GKMP Architects and skillful conversion Three into Two house in the Liberties by Brian O’Brien of Solearth Ecological Architecture.

Open House Dublin 2011 takes place from 7th to 9th October.

Visit Open House for more information

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

The Tyndall National Institute at University College Cork was the final destination for Queen Elisabeth to complete an historic four day tour of Ireland. The Tyndall Institute, established in 2004, is one of Europe’s leading Nano-Technology research centers specialising in ICT hardware research, the commercialisation of technology and the education of next generation researchers.

The tour included an inspection of the new laboratory research building, sited in the historic Lee Maltings complex beside the River Lee. The new facility, designed by Scott Tallon Walker Architects, was opened in 2009 and provides world-class laboratory and clean rooms for the Institute. A glazed atrium cleverly links an existing listed building with the new facilities, and provides a brightly-lit energy efficient research environment. This approach to energy management for the new facility was so successful, that when audited it showed a 70% reduction in CO2 emissions per researcher.

The Tyndall Institute was named after John Tyndall, the prominent 19th Century Irish physicist, who rose to fame in the 1850s when he invented a method for the destruction of bacteria in food, which he named Tyndallisation. His later work included studies in relation to the scattering of light by particulate impurities in the air, known today as the Tyndall Effect.


Tyndall National Institute

University College Cork - Tyndall National Institute

Irish Times - An Irishwoman's Diary

Irish Times - Tyndall Institute

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Aviva Stadium designed by international practice Populous and Scott Tallon Walker Architects has won a RIBA (Royal Institute of British Architects) Award for projects in the European Union region.

Developed on the site of the world’s oldest international rugby ground at Lansdowne Road, the 50,000 seat Aviva Stadium is Ireland’s home for Rugby and Soccer international matches. In addition to being a world class sporting venue, the finished building is a unique addition to Dublin’s urban fabric.

The organic form of the stadium was developed as a response to the site and its surroundings, and sweeps down to a single tier at the North end to maintain daylight to the adjacent residential gardens and so open up the stadium bowl to the city.

The buildings are judged in the first instance by shortlisting panels in each region, who visit schemes individually and meet to produce a list of buildings to be visited by the region's jury.

The RIBA Awards have been running continuously since 1966. No matter the shape, size, budget or location, winning schemes set the standard for great architecture. RIBA Awards are for buildings by RIBA Chartered Architects and RIBA International Fellows. Winners will be considered for the RIBA Stirling Prize.

Aviva Stadium Project

View the RIBA Submission

RIBA Awards 2011

Building Design - 2011 RIBA Awards announced

 
 
 
 
 

The awards ceremony took place at the Burlington Hotel on Thursday, April 14th 2011. Scott Tallon Walker Architects were shortlisted for 2 categories and were successful in the Green Building Award for Aviva Stadium

The following are the submissions entries:

 
 
 
 
 
 

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